‘Dating God’ Author Quoted in Article on Mysticism

In an excellent article by Mary DeTurris Poust, an author of several books and a regular Catholic newspaper columnist, which appears in the current issue of the well-known and widely circulated Catholic Newsweekly, Our Sunday Visitor, one can find extensive quotes from me (Br. Daniel Horan, OFM) on the subject of contemporary mysticism.

The article is titled, “Unlocking the Mystery of Mysticism,” Poust explains that the Christian tradition offers much by way of understanding our relationship with God and seeing the Divine in our everyday world. The piece features interviews with Thomas Neal, the director of St. Joseph Educational Center in Des Moines, Iowa; Jesuit John Surette, author of The Divine Dynamic: Exploring the Relationship Between Humans, Earth and the Creative Power of the Universe; and yours truly.

Although you have to be a registered subscriber to read this particular article online, many Catholic parishes and certain newsstands and bookstores carry this publication. Here’s a sample of Poust’s piece featuring my interview.

Order of Friars Minor Brother Daniel Horan, who teaches in the religion [sic] studies department at Siena College in Albany, N.Y., and writes about experiencing God in daily life on his blog Dating God (www.DatingGod.org), stressed that prayer life is “central to opening ourselves up to recognize the mystical experiences in life.” Drawing on his Franciscan tradition, Brother Horan said that prayer is more than what we say or do at set times of day.

“Prayer must become for us a way of being in the world, a disposition that has more to do with relationship than it does with rote recitation. In this sense, I’m speaking about contemplation or the ongoing movement toward awareness of God, not just at this or that time, but at all times,” said Brother Horan, whose book, “Dating God: Franciscan Spirituality for the Next Generation” (St. Anthony Messenger Press) will be released next year.

“This is what distinguishes someone like St. Francis of Assisi or St. Teresa of Ávila from most of us. The more they sought to focus their lives on God and the proximity of God to them in a world of grace, the more they came to recognize what we call the mystical in the ordinary.”

This is a whole lot more, hopefully this will interest you enough to check out the full article, a very well-written piece. I was delighted to be asked for an interview and to be so well represented in the article itself (something that, as many who are frequently interviewed realize, doesn’t happen too often).

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