Thomas Merton on Ash Wednesday

“Even the darkest moments of the liturgy are filled with joy, and Ash Wednesday, the beginning of the lenten fast, is a day of happiness, a Christian feast.”

In 1958 Thomas Merton wrote an essay titled, “Ash Wednesday,” which offers a reflection on the relationship between penance and joy found in the celebration of the beginning of Lent and the marking of our foreheads with ashes. Instead of me rambling on and on here today, I thought it would be good to share more from Merton himself. You can read the entire essay in Seasons of Celebration (FSG 1965), 113-124.

“Ash Wednesday is for people who know that it means for their soul to be logged with these icy waters: all of us are such people, if only we can realize it.

“There is confidence everywhere in Ash Wednesday, yet that does not mean unmixed and untroubled security. The confidence of the Christian is always a confidence in spite of darkness and risk, in the presence of peril, with every evidence of possible disaster…

“Once again, Lent is not just a time for squaring conscious accounts: but for realizing what we had perhaps not seen before. The light of Lent is given us to help us with this realization.

“Nevertheless, the liturgy of Ash Wednesday is not focussed on the sinfulness of the penitent but on the mercy of God. The question of sinfulness is raised precisely because this is a day of mercy, and the just do not need a savior.”

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5 Responses to “Thomas Merton on Ash Wednesday”

  1. [...] because this is a day of mercy, and the just do not need a savior.”– Thomas Merton, quoted here.Posted in Quote of the day, Thomas Merton | Tagged Ash Wednesday, Thomas Merton | No Comments [...]

  2. Thank you for this.

    Peace.
    (an oblate novice of St. Benedict)

  3. l. t. wheeler Says:

    Thanks for the beautiful Merton quotes.

  4. [...] precisely because this is a day of mercy, and the just do not need a savior.” – Thomas Merton HT. Joel Watts is a Masters of Theological Studies student with a focus in Rhetorical and Mimetic [...]

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